flagstaff roofing tools on roof

Signs That You Might Need a Re-roof or Roof Repair

When it has not rained in a long time, most people assume that their roof is in “just fine” condition. We hear it all the time even when the roof is in bad condition. Quick glances at a roof will not show you if it’s in need of a repair or replacement. Not if you do not know the signs of a damaged, worn, or weathered roof.
Signs that your roof might need a reroof or repair:

  • Shingles are visibly torn, ripped, or curling up from certain spots. Even if one is missing, water that seeps through the gap could spread throughout the woodwork of your home. Underlayment starts to deteriorate as soon is it expose to the elements so the longer you wait to get it repaired or replaced it just gets worse.
  • Your roof has “bald spots” where the granules of the shingles have been worn away by the wind, rain and constant beating of the sun if you notice a buildup of granules in or around drains.
  • Darkened shingles indicate that mold or moss is growing under or on them. An herbicide solution may be able to remove the mold and restore the shingles to a better condition without requiring total replacement.
  • It has been 15-20 years or more since the last time your roof was maintained or replaced. Very few shingle-systems are expected to last more than two decades. Maintenance is the key to preventing a leak.
  • Walking on your roof feels like there are sponges or springs underneath your feet. This is indicative of underlying ply boards being soaked with water due to an unnoticed or unaddressed leak.
  • Drywall on the interior of your home is discolored. Unless the discoloration is immediately adjacent to a water outlet, like a faucet or showerhead, it is probably due to a roof leak and not a plumbing leak.
  • For concert tile roofs the first sign that you are starting to have problems is when it start’s leaking in the garage and leaking in the valleys between 18-20yrs. You should have your underlayment check to see the condition of your roof.

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